Tuesday, 26 February 2013

The Scarlet Letter



The Scarlet Letter is an 1850 romantic work of fiction in a historical setting, written by Nathaniel Hawthorne. It is considered to be his magnum opus. Set in 17th-century Puritan Boston, Massachusetts during the years 1642 to 1649, it tells the story of Hester Prynne, who conceives a daughter through an adulterous affair and struggles to create a new life of repentance and dignity. Throughout the book, Hawthorne explores themes of legalism, sin, and guilt.

Thursday, 26 July 2012

Scarlet

Scarlet may refer to:
Scarlet (color), a bright tone of red that is slightly toward orange
Scarlet (cloth), type of woollen cloth common in medieval England
Scarlet (magazine), women's magazine in the UK
Scarlet (Closterkeller album), 1995
Scarlet (Code Red album), 1997
Scarlet (British band), UK vocal duo
Scarlet (American band), metalcore band
Scarlet (telco), a telecommunications company active in Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxembourg
Scarlet (Icon Comics), a creator-owned comicbook series by Brian Michael Bendis
Scarlets (formerly the Llanelli Scarlets), a Welsh rugby union team
The Scarlet, a compact, 3K-resolution digital cinema camera from Red Digital Cinema Camera Company
Scarlet Records, an Italian independent record label

Tuesday, 10 January 2012

Scarlet

Scarlet (from the Persian سقرلات saqerlât) is a bright red color with a hue that is somewhat toward the orange and is redder than vermilion. It is a pure chroma on the color wheel one-fourth of the way between red and orange. Scarlet is sometimes used as the color of flame. It may also symbolize the color of the blood of a living person, like crimson, although the actual color of blood (from hemoglobin) is closer to crimson than scarlet.

Friday, 26 August 2011

Scarlet


Scarlet (from the Persian سآقرلآت säqirlāt) is a bright red color with a hue that is somewhat toward the orange. It is redder than vermilion. It is a pure chroma on the color wheel one-fourth of the way between red and orange.  Scarlet is sometimes used as the color of flame. It may also symbolize the color of the blood of a living person, like crimson, although the actual color of blood (from hemoglobin) is closer to crimson than scarlet.
An early recorded use of scarlet as a color name in the English language dates to 1250.